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Using Patient-Specific 3D Printed Surgical Guides for Total Knee Replacement

by  | Jul 13, 2018 | 3D PrintingMedical 3D Printing

While surgery has always, ultimately, been about the patient, it hasn’t always been patient-centered. Historically, patients have not had an easy time of understanding exactly what their surgery entails and have often been treated as if they were ancillary to the surgical problem presented. This can’t all be blamed on uncaring medical staff, as most people involved in medicine do care and care profoundly. Instead, it has largely been a result of resources and standing custom. Surgical procedures are complicated and difficult to understand, hence the reason why experts are the ones who address them, and the pressure and stress involved in going into a procedure largely blind has made it difficult for surgeons to relax and broaden their focus to include the patient beyond the problem.

3D technology is making great contributions to medicine, from aiding in research to assisting in the preparation of students to practice medicine to producing the tools necessary to perform better operations. It is being integrated into the surgical theater and changing the face of surgery as we know it. One of the ways it is doing this is through the provision of a greatly improved ability to plan for the procedure. 3D technology not only allows the medical team a sneak preview, 3D printing can create models of the particular areas to be addressed and allow surgeons to study them in advance. This helps minimize surprises and therefore reduces the stress on both the patient and the medical staff.

The staff at Orthoparc in the Netherlands has figured out another way to help create and deliver the best in patient centered care. Using 3D technology, they have developed a method of patient-centered total knee replacement that allows a patient to walk in, in the morning, and walk out that same day. Such a possibility requires a highly interconnected team of specialists working together to ensure that not only does the patient get the knee replacement they need, but their psychological, nutritional, and whole health needs are met as well.

One component of this is the integration of 3D printed, patient-specific surgical guides that take the uncertainty out of the procedure itself. These surgical guides are produced using data gathered about an individual patient’s knee and are fabricated in-house on a 3D printer. When placed upon the patient during surgery, they guide the surgeon to exactly where cuts need to be made in relationship to where the knee is resting. Dr. Saskia Boekhorst is an orthopedic surgeon at Orthoparc, and she described the impact these guides have had in her experience.

 

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Drue De Angelis

Drue is Managing Partner for The De Angelis Group, Executive Search firm exclusively for the Ortho & Spine industry.

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